Breastfeeding comes with many health benefits for both you and your baby. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recognizes human milk as the preferred nutrition source for infants. For women who choose to breastfeed, doing so may prove more difficult when it is time to go back to work. Returning to work outside the home during the first year after birth can create barriers to breastfeeding and may cause women to stop nursing when they return to work.

Studies have found evidence that breastfeeding decreases your child's risk of ear infections, pulmonary infections, diarrhea, obesity, sudden infant death syndrome, and many other conditions. For these reasons, the AAP now recommends breastfeeding for the first year of a child's life.

Breastfeeding also benefits mom by reducing the risk of postpartum depression, speeding the return to pre-pregnancy weight, and possibly reducing the risk of several serious diseases including ovarian and breast cancers, high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart disease.

Breastfeeding also provides health benefits to infant. Since breastfed infants tend to be sick less often, working mothers who breastfeed avoid lost days at work.

By breastfeeding, you will also strengthen the mother-infant bond, which will help boost your confidence. A woman's confidence in herself as a mother may be vulnerable when she becomes separated for her infant for long periods of time. Continuing to breastfeed serves as a constant reminder of the mother-infant bond despite the pressures a new mother may encounter during the workday.

Finally, mothers may find breastfeeding convenient, since they avoid the preparation and expense that formula feeding requires.