The Medical Center of Aurora Announces 2011 Community Partner

The Medical Center of Aurora Announces the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Colorado-Wyoming Chapter as its 2011 Community Partner

Aurora, CO, April 13, 2011 – The Medical Center of Aurora/Centennial Medical Plaza announced that the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society, Colorado-Wyoming Chapter, will be the hospital’s 2011 Community Partner. The hospital has set a goal of contributing 2,000 volunteer hours and raising $71,500 for programs and research that will benefit Coloradans living with MS.

Established in 2008, The Medical Center of Aurora’s Community Partner Program is a community involvement initiative dedicated to workplace giving. On an annual basis, The Medical Center of Aurora chooses a local nonprofit partner. Hospital employees then donate volunteer time and coordinate and participate in fundraising events for the nonprofit organization.

In 2008, $22,954 and 740 volunteer hours were contributed to Project Angel Heart. Last year, in 2010, $82,084 and 3,100 volunteer hours were contributed to American Heart Association. “Our annual Community Partnership is one of many ways in which we take our mission ‘to care for and improve human life’ out into our local community,” said John Hill, president and CEO of The Medical Center of Aurora/Centennial Medical Plaza. “As Colorado has one of the highest rates of MS in the country, this incurable and unpredictable disease is an issue that hits home. We are excited to join forces with the National MS Society and look forward to the opportunities this partnership will bring.”

 “We are very excited and honored to have been selected as The Medical Center of Aurora’s community partner this year,” said Carrie Nolan, president, Colorado-Wyoming Chapter, National MS Society. “The support generated through this partnership will support resources and research that will benefit the 80,000 affected by MS in Colorado. This is an outstanding commitment by The Medical Center of Aurora and we look forward to working in partnership toward our ultimate goal of a world free of MS,” Nolan emphasized.

About The Medical Center of Aurora

The Medical Center of Aurora, the first community hospital in the Denver Metro area to receive Magnet Recognition for nursing excellence is an acute care hospital with specialization in cardiovascular services, neurosciences, oncology, surgery and women’s services. The Medical Center of Aurora also has Primary Stroke Certification.

The hospital is a Level II trauma center, serving the eastern metro area and I-70 corridor with emergency care, EMS education and support. Licensed for 346 beds, the facility is located at Interstate 225 and Mississippi in Aurora, Colo., and encompasses Main and North Campus locations along with Centennial Medical Plaza in the southeast metro area. Selected as a "Best Place to Work" by the Denver Business Journal (2010), the hospital and its three campuses are part of the HealthONE System of Excellence.

About the Colorado-Wyoming Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society

The Colorado-Wyoming Chapter of the National MS Society provides comprehensive programs and advocacy to assist and empower the more than 88,000 individuals residing in Colorado and Wyoming who are affected by MS. The Colorado-Wyoming Chapter is also a driving force of research for the prevention, treatment and cure of MS and contributes funds to support 325 National MS Society research projects worldwide – five of which are located in Colorado. The Chapter has offices in Denver, Colorado Springs, Fort Collins, Grand Junction and Cheyenne serving the Colorado and Wyoming communities.

About Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) interrupts the flow of information between the brain and body and it stops people from moving. Every hour in the United States, someone is newly diagnosed with MS, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with more than three times as many women as men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 400,000 in the U.S. and 2.4 million worldwide.